I recently asked a friend, “What is your Dream Job?”   It’s always fun to hear what people would love to do.  Here’s what he said…

I’m pretty lucky that I’m doing exactly what I love and if I were independently wealthy I likely wouldn’t change much.

Lucky.  We have this belief that somehow there are a few people out there, the lucky few, who get to do work they love.  But I don’t think it’s luck.  

There was a lot of ‘background noise’ from family, etc. who thought someone starting a PhD at 30 was crazy, irresponsible, etc (stupid was the word most often used) but I just let that noise fade into the background.

The funny thing is that once people saw how passionate I was about my area, how much I loved working hard on something I loved, the laughter ended and I think people got a bit jealous that they didn’t have that same passion for their own work.  

-Wyatt Simmons


So why is it reckless to pursue something we love?  

Stupid isn’t a word I’d use to describe someone with a PhD, who has published multiple books and articles, and travels around the world to speak at conferences about his research.  What if he would have listened to them?

This week I asked five people to share their dream jobs and explain what’s holding them back.

 

Dream Jobs

If there was nothing holding you back, what would you love to try?

My plan is to get a used Mini Cooper, paint it, and drive around Canada and the US making street espressos, lattes, and flat whites for some lucky people. My car will be a beacon of rich, creamy caffeine for unsuspecting souls in dire need of a double shot.
– The Espresso Dragon

My dream job would be a travel blog writer (and get paid to do it).  It combines three things I love to do:  travel to new and exciting places, plan, act, reflect, and write, and finally to help people by giving good advice.  -Brooke Daniels

I would still love to do my PhD and over the past few years I’ve been very drawn to entrepreneurship. I’ve gone through a few iterations of what this might look like, ranging from very unique C2C solutions to more straightforward service & product driven businesses. I’m still undecided.   -Sarah

My dream job would be with the FBI on their behavioural analysis unit…yes like Criminal Minds!  I studied some psychology and actually majored in criminology for two years.  -BAUgirl

 

Why Not?

What are some reasons why you wouldn’t give it a go?

By the time this occurs, I hope to be a grandfather and have my espresso-mobile double as a babysitting vehicle.  – The Espresso Dragon

I don’t know who would hire me to do it and I’m not sure I would have enough followers if I started my own blog since I need this to pay the bills for all the travelling I am planning on doing.  – Brooke Daniels

I’m risk adverse by default, and that doesn’t always jive well with entrepreneurship! Perhaps it will be something I explore while I’m also working full time, or maybe I’ll luck out and get fired which would force my hand! – Sarah

I stopped pursuing my dream because of “the” guy. I met a guy with whom I was engaged to and he really did not see himself with that kind of career woman…so, I switched!  Regrets…I have a few….  -BAUgirl

To me, these jobs aren’t out of reach.  They’re not impossible.  Especially when I know this group of people.  

They are intelligent.  Driven.  Always challenging themselves and always learning something new.  I admire each of them for different reasons.  If anyone could make their dream jobs a reality, it’s this bunch.  

And yet, I don’t know if they will.  This may sound harsh and that’s not my intention.


We love how dream jobs sound in theory, myself included, but according to the Huffington Post, only about 30% of us actually do it.  Why is that?

Because there’s a chance that it won’t work out.  We hear stories about people who went bankrupt.  Stress that broke up marriages.  Best friends who were once partners but haven’t spoken in a year.

Our imaginations take over and we picture the worst.  And when those closest to us, family and friends, begin to doubt the possibility of us being successful, it seems downright impossible.

And yet around 30% of us still do it.

I spoke with a few friends who are retired.  I wanted to know what advice they’d give.  What would you say to someone who plans to pursue their dream job in retirement?  Should they wait?  Is retirement all it’s cracked up to be?  

Deep down, I hoped they’d say, Do it now.  You never know what’s going to happen.  Retirement isn’t what people think it is…[insert personal story that would inspire me to take a leap].  

But here’s what they said…

[In retirement] we have more time and security to think about what we want to do.  We can exercise more care and caution when it comes to making personal compromises.  I think this inspires a new kind of energy to whatever becomes the “dream job” because it’s not the job itself, whatever it is, that is the ideal but how it is achieved in the balance of a new, more carefully examined life.   -Cate

I retired, spur of the moment.  I had no plans.  I find that of all my friends who retired, I apparently am the only one not dealing well with it and that’s probably because I loved working.  I find I sit on the couch and watch TV or I am on the computer all day.  I do volunteer twice a week at the Hope Centre but that does not give me the excitement I had when I worked.  It just kills time.

I would say go for it.  The only thing that can happen, is they either make it or they don’t, but at least they tried.  Who knows, if it fails, something different might come out of it and it becomes something better. Time, well, there is nothing but time.   -Connie

Life is unpredictable.  Achieving your dream job at any time of your life is contingent upon what rightly requires your best energy and attention.  Your dream job needs to fit into the vagaries of what makes up your very real life and it’s immediate demands.  This is not terrible.  This is in line with a new kind of personal growth; something that evolves organically and from within rather than being imposed upon you from some external source.  This is life-affirming and personally enriching if it is successful.  – Cate


Life-affirming.  Personally enriching.  

Yes, you need to be smart about the decisions you make and think about the best interests of those around you.

Yes, you are your worst critic.  And you may have others join in to share how “stupid” you’re being and suggest that you think it through.   

And yes, it is scary.  You don’t know how things will turn out.

But I still want to be in that 30%.  

Reckless, stupid, irresponsible, and happy.